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Do-Advice » Health & Fitness

Archive for the 'Health & Fitness' Category

How Hair Transplant Replacement Works

Posted in Hair Transplant on April 30th, 2007

Hair transplantation – “hair transplant” — is a surgical procedure that involves moving sections of scalp where hair still grows to a part of the scalp that is bald or where the hair is thinning.

History of hair transplantation

Hair restoration started in 1930, when Japanese doctors experimented to see if skin and hair could be transplanted from healthy parts of the body to parts that had been disfigured by injury.

In 1950, dermatologist Norman Orentreich wrote an article explaining how hair transplantation could be done. Although his studies were not embraced by the scientific community, he became even more determined to prove his theory “donor dominance,” which states that even when hair is relocated to a bald area it will continue to grow as it did before. He is considered the father of hair transplants.

Hair transplantation is the most common elective surgery among men. The reason for its popularity among men is the fact that results gained from this procedure are much better compared to other similar hair replacement procedures. The hair transplantation of today is not really different from the hair transplantation Dr. Orentreich performed — however, today’s hair transplantation involves graft or plug size.

The older method of hair transplantation is easily identified by its patchy appearance. This used to be the norm, until transplant surgeons critically examined the possibilities of using a different graft size. It was determined that better results would be gleaned from using grafts that were smaller.

What happens during a hair transplant?

As mentioned earlier, hair transplantation involves moving small pieces of scalp where hair still grows to a part of the scalp that is bald or where the hair is thinning.

There are five types of grafts, varying in size and shape. These are: punch grafts, mini-grafts, micro-grafts, slit grafts and strip grafts. Since this new method of hair transplantation makes use of smaller sizes of grafts, many surgical procedures are needed to fully covered a bald area, taking as long as two years. The number of large plugs transplanted during the first sessions of surgery varies with each individual, but the average is usually about 50. With mini-graphs or micro-graphs there may be up tp 700 plugs transplanted per session.

For more information on hair transplantation, ask your surgeon.

Fibromyalgia and Pregnancy

Posted in Health & Fitness on April 27th, 2007

If you have Fibromyalgia and you want to have a baby, you might be wondering what you will have to go through. There is very little known about the effects of this condition on pregnant women, and some of the research is quite contradictory. Some studies suggest that Fibromyalgia and pregnancy are troublesome together, and that expectant mothers often see an increase in symptoms, while others say that some who are pregnant say they feel better than they ever have in years.

There have been very few studies on what happens when someone with Fibromyalgia gets pregnant. A study in Norway in the 1970s concluded that women with this condition have exaggerated symptoms and are completely miserable while pregnant. They are also more prone to getting post-partum depression. Their intensified symptoms lingered as long as three months after giving birth. The good news is that the babies, however, were healthy and normal.

Others claim that pregnancy hormones might actually reduce the symptoms of Fibromyalgia. Though there are still the common ills that plague some women such as morning sickness and aches and pains, the other symptoms seemed to improve greatly while they were pregnant. It would appear that what happens during this time will differ greatly from woman to woman, and a person with this condition will probably not know what to expect until they experience it.

If you have Fibromyalgia, and you want to get pregnant, don’t let your condition stop you. It would seem that babies born to women with this condition are carried to term, are very healthy, and come out a very good weight. However, there are some things to be considered. You should remember that if you are on medications, some are not going to be safe to continue taking while you are expecting. If you plan to nurse, you may have to stay off of your medications while you are breastfeeding.

Talk with your doctor about what you can do to prepare for pregnancy. Something like yoga might be a good idea. This is moderate exercise with stress relieving qualities. This might help you feel better while pregnant, and might also help you conceive more quickly by reducing stress. Do you best to modify your diet if you have not already done so, and if you go to a new doctor once you have found out you are pregnant, make sure you tell them that you have Fibromyalgia. You might have to be under the care of both your obstetrician and your regular doctor.

A doctor might want to watch your sleep cycles while you are pregnant, as things can get worse as your body becomes more uncomfortable with the bulk of the baby in the uterus. Because many with this condition are prone to depression, that should be watched as well. Depression can intensify due to pregnancy hormones, so an anti-depressant that is safe for pregnant women might need to be prescribed.

Though you might feel better than ever, or perhaps worse than ever, there are things you can do to make Fibromyalgia and pregnancy more compatible. At the very least, it appears that you don’t have to worry about it affecting your baby, welcome news for prospective parents.

Grab your free copy of Jane Thompson’s brand new Fibromyalgia Newsletter - Overflowing with easy to implement methods to help you find out about fibromyalgia treatment and for information on fibromyalgia sign and symptoms please visit Natural Cure to Fibromyalgia.

Fibromyalgia and Pregnancy

Posted in Health & Fitness on April 27th, 2007

If you have Fibromyalgia and you want to have a baby, you might be wondering what you will have to go through. There is very little known about the effects of this condition on pregnant women, and some of the research is quite contradictory. Some studies suggest that Fibromyalgia and pregnancy are troublesome together, and that expectant mothers often see an increase in symptoms, while others say that some who are pregnant say they feel better than they ever have in years.

There have been very few studies on what happens when someone with Fibromyalgia gets pregnant. A study in Norway in the 1970s concluded that women with this condition have exaggerated symptoms and are completely miserable while pregnant. They are also more prone to getting post-partum depression. Their intensified symptoms lingered as long as three months after giving birth. The good news is that the babies, however, were healthy and normal.

Others claim that pregnancy hormones might actually reduce the symptoms of Fibromyalgia. Though there are still the common ills that plague some women such as morning sickness and aches and pains, the other symptoms seemed to improve greatly while they were pregnant. It would appear that what happens during this time will differ greatly from woman to woman, and a person with this condition will probably not know what to expect until they experience it.

If you have Fibromyalgia, and you want to get pregnant, don’t let your condition stop you. It would seem that babies born to women with this condition are carried to term, are very healthy, and come out a very good weight. However, there are some things to be considered. You should remember that if you are on medications, some are not going to be safe to continue taking while you are expecting. If you plan to nurse, you may have to stay off of your medications while you are breastfeeding.

Talk with your doctor about what you can do to prepare for pregnancy. Something like yoga might be a good idea. This is moderate exercise with stress relieving qualities. This might help you feel better while pregnant, and might also help you conceive more quickly by reducing stress. Do you best to modify your diet if you have not already done so, and if you go to a new doctor once you have found out you are pregnant, make sure you tell them that you have Fibromyalgia. You might have to be under the care of both your obstetrician and your regular doctor.

A doctor might want to watch your sleep cycles while you are pregnant, as things can get worse as your body becomes more uncomfortable with the bulk of the baby in the uterus. Because many with this condition are prone to depression, that should be watched as well. Depression can intensify due to pregnancy hormones, so an anti-depressant that is safe for pregnant women might need to be prescribed.

Though you might feel better than ever, or perhaps worse than ever, there are things you can do to make Fibromyalgia and pregnancy more compatible. At the very least, it appears that you don’t have to worry about it affecting your baby, welcome news for prospective parents.

Grab your free copy of Jane Thompson’s brand new Fibromyalgia Newsletter - Overflowing with easy to implement methods to help you find out about fibromyalgia treatment and for information on fibromyalgia sign and symptoms please visit Natural Cure to Fibromyalgia.

Endometriosis After Hysterectomy Are Relapses Common?

Posted in Health & Fitness on March 19th, 2007

Experiencing endometriosis after hysterectomy is a likely possibility, and is why treatments such as mirena may still be needed.  This may come as a surprise to you, especially if you have been under the impression that a total hysterectomy (removal of the entire uterus, ovaries, and part or the entire cervix) can provide relief from the painful symptoms caused by endometriosis. 

Although it does sound logical that the removal of the organs infected by endometriosis would put a stop to the disease, this, unfortunately, is not the reality for a number of women.  In fact it is estimated that 10-15 percent of women with endometriosis, who undergo a hysterectomy, experience an endometriosis recurrence after 1 – 3 years following the procedure, and as many as 50 percent have a recurrence after 5 years.

How can the return of endometriosis after hysterectomy be possible?  First and foremost, there is no cure for endometriosis.  Secondly, it’s a known fact that implants (endometrial tissue) can be found outside of the uterus and ovaries, and can occur throughout the pelvic cavity and beyond (I.E. bowels, bladder and rectum).  Therefore, if implants occur in areas outside the uterus, a total hysterectomy will not remove all of the disease. 

That being said, there are surgeons that will attempt to remove any implants they find in other regions aside from the reproductive organs.  However, there is still a high possibility that some of the disease will be left behind, as some implants are microscopic and can go undetected.

Another problem that can cause endometriosis after hysterectomy is hormone replacement therapy.  If a woman undergoes a total hysterectomy, she has lost her ovaries, and is, therefore, in full blown menopause.  Although menopause can be beneficial in relieving endometriosis symptoms, because it stops the production of estrogen (the hormone that feeds the disease), the female body requires a certain level of estrogen in order to function properly. 

In other words, while endometriosis may no longer be a problem, unpleasant menopause symptoms due to lack of estrogen (I.E. hot flashes, headaches, vaginal dryness, bone loss, etc.) will be.   Hence, women who have undergone a total hysterectomy, and do not take hormone replacement therapy, may find relief from their endometriosis but not their menopausal symptoms, or vice versa.  These women often find themselves in a no win situation.

Are their ways to treat endometriosis after hysterectomy?  Yes.  The following are some treatment methods you may want to consider -

- Control your diet – Find out what foods you should avoid that can trigger endometriosis symptoms or make them worse.
- Medical therapies – There are different remedies such as oral contraceptives, and the drugs Progestin and Danazol, which help to prevent the growth of endometrial tissue.  You may also consider taking over-the-counter medication such as NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs – I.E. aspirin, ibuprofen) to help alleviate painful symptoms.
- Alternative remedies – non-drug therapies that may be useful include acupuncture, acupressure, aromatherapy, hypnosis, messages, herbal remedies, etc.

Essentially, when it comes to treatment, the best course of action you can take is to talk to your doctor about your options to find out which ones are right for you.

Finally, if you have endometriosis or know someone who does, and are thinking about having a total or partial hysterectomy, it is imperative that you explore other treatment options first.  The chance of a recurrence of endometriosis after hysterectomy is high enough that it shouldn’t be ignored.  There is no reason to put your body through the stress of such extreme surgery, when there are other options available to you.
Have you signed up for the free newsletter? It’s a great way of staying on top of the latest endometriosis news and treatment options. Sign up today and discover signs of endometriosis and what the different stages of endometriosis are, plus the endometriosis treatment options.

Create a Personal Candida Cook Book and Food Journal

Posted in Health & Fitness on March 8th, 2007

A candida cook book is a good idea for anyone who suffers from, or is prone to candida overgrowth. It is important that a candida sufferer takes every necessary precaution to avoid developing a fungal infection (Candidiasis) in their intestinal tract, mouth, skin, and genitals. The best way to control a Candida overgrowth is to follow a specific diet that does not encourage the development of bad gut bacteria or yeast.

However, before a candida cook book is started, you first need to create a food journal and carefully analyze your diet and find out which foods trigger candidasis, and those that done. You can then create an anti-candida diet based on your findings.

There are many foods that can cause an overgrowth in candida such as:
- Sugar in all it’s forms (refined, artificial, natural)
- Yeast food products – bread, pizza dough, breadcrumbs
- Refined grains – foods that are made with white flower (I.E. pasta, bread, cereal
- Smoked and cured food products - processed meat, bacon, sausage, etc.
- Beverages – Caffeinated coffee, tea, soda, beer, liquor, wine etc.
- Fermented food products – pickles, vinegar, soy sauce, etc.
- Dairy products – cheeses, cream, cows milk, etc.
- Peanut and peanut products
- And so on

Knowing what foods are considered safe to eat is just as important as knowing what to eliminate when creating a candida cook book. This is because, you need to know what food you can use to make healthy recipes you can enjoy and are fungal-free. Below is a brief list of foods most candida suffers can eat –
- Herbs and mild spices such as garlic
- Fresh vegetables – onions, carrots, cucumber, etc.
- Legumes – peas, beans, etc.
- Dairy - Butter, cottage cheese, yogurt
- Eggs and unprocessed, organic meat
- Oats such as porridge
- Whole grain products – rice, bread, etc.
- Oily fish such as mackerel, salmon, sardines, tuna, etc.
- Eggs
- Beverages – water, fresh fruit juice, herbal teas, fresh vegetable juice, such as pumpkin juice (Note: be careful with vegetable juices, as many of them, especially carrot contain plenty of sugar)

Keep in mind that some of the foods in the above list could aggravate candida symptoms. This is why it is imperative you create your own person food journal to determine what foods are best for you. Once you know what foods you can safely incorporate into your diet, you can begin creating you own candidia cook book by finding recipes that have “safe” ingredients.

Where can you find recipes? You can find recipes in special cooking books for candida in local and online bookstores. You can also find many recipes online by simply searching for the keyword “candida recipe”. An example of an excellent online site is Candidadiet. com.

Create a candida cook book
Once you find recipes, you’ll need somewhere to put them. You’ll find that creating your own cook book is an easy process. The following are the supplies you will need to create your own cook book include:
- 3-hole punched paper to manually record recipes
- Binder to store recipes
- 3-hole punch so you can print off recipes online and add them to your binder
- Pen/ pencil
- Dividers so you can divide your cook book into sections.

To keep your cook book organized, it’s a good idea to divide it into different recipe sections. You may find this suggestion helpful:
- Appetizers
- Salads
- Soups
- Sauces
- Main course
- Desserts
- Beverages

Finally, don’t forget that you can put your own chef abilities to the test and create your own yummy tasting recipes, and add them to your candida cook book as well.
By Jane Symms. Sign up for a free newsletter that has proven methods for tackling Candida, Candidiasis and yeast infections head-on at Eliminate Candida Naturally. On the site you’ll also find more about the different candida treatment available and information on the benefits of starting a candida cook book and journal.

5 Ways to Fight IBS Diarrhea

Posted in Health & Fitness on March 1st, 2007

Constipation can be a difficult IBS symptom to deal with, but so can diarrhea. People who suffer from diarrhea-predominant IBS experience frequent bowel movements of watery and/or loose stool. Other diarrhea-related symptoms include abdominal pain or discomfort, cramping, bloating, gas, nausea and dehydration.

The following are 5 treatment options for relieving IBS related diarrhea:

1 - Diet Control
Before resorting to medications or alternative remedies, you should always consider your diet first. Although diet changes may not entirely cure you from diarrhea, it may help reduce the frequency of attacks. Therefore, you should monitor your diet by keeping a food diary and recording the symptoms you feel after eating different foods to determine which ones cause diarrhea and which ones don’t.

For instance, avoiding/limiting foods high in refined, artificial or natural sugar can help alleviate diarrhea symptoms. This doesn’t only include chocolate, caffeine, alcohol and sweets. It also means foods containing fructose such as honey and a variety of fruits. Foods high in sugar can act like a laxative to your body, especially for an IBS sufferer who already has a sensitive stomach.

You should also ask your doctor to test you for lactose intolerance, as an inability to properly digest milk sugar can cause diarrhea.

2 – OTC Antidiarrheal Drugs
Over-the-counter (OTC) antidiarrheal medications can be effective at providing diarrhea relief when used as short-term treatment. There are two types of antidiarrheal drugs.

- Stool thickeners -these contain fruit pectin and clay which absorb toxins and bacteria in the intestine to help thicken stool (I.E. Kaopectate)
- Antispasmodic - these slow spasms that occur in the intestine (I.E. Imodium).

Although, antidiarrheals are usually effective, they may not help other symptoms such as bloating or abdominal discomfort. Furthermore, prolonged use of antidiarrheals can result in dry mouth, constipation, and other symptoms.

Consult your doctor about OTC antidiarrheal meds for IBS treatment before taking anything. In addition, you shouldn’t resort to antidiarrheals until at least 24 hours after experiencing diarrhea, as you don’t want to stop your body from expelling toxins in the event your diarrhea is a result of bacteria such as food poisoning.

3 – Prescription Medications
Low doses of tricyclic antidepressants are commonly prescribed to IBS patients for abdominal pain. These meds effectively block pain signals to the brain and don’t cause diarrhea. However, they can cause other symptoms including constipation.

Another medication that may be prescribed is Lotronex. This particular drug is designed to block the effect serotonin (chemical produced by the body) has on digestive system, and in so doing, soothes the colon and slows bowl movement frequency. Lotronex has been found to be successful at alleviating IBS symptoms including diarrhea, stomach discomfort and urgency.

Note: Lotronex has only been approved for women who suffer from severe cases of diarrhea-predominant IBS ad have not responded to previous treatment methods.

4 – Alternative Therapy
Alternative therapies such as acupuncture, probiotics and herbal remedies can effectively reduce and alleviate diarrhea and its related symptoms in some IBS sufferers. Each of these methods is designed to assist the body in healing itself by providing it with stimulation (acupuncture), healthy gut bacteria (probiotics), or herbs. All work to aid in normal digestion.

If you are interested in learning about alternative treatments, talk to you health care provider first, and be sure to seek treatment from qualified practitioners.

5 – Behavioural therapy
Stress can actually trigger your IBS symptoms and make diarrhea worse, by causing your stomach to tense, leading to cramping and overall stomach upset. You can help reduce the regular stress in your life, and the stress you feel towards your IBS condition by engaging in:
- Meditation exercises (I.E. Yoga)
- Relaxation therapy
- Hypnotherapy
- Cognitive behavioural therapy

It’s also a good idea to distract yourself by taking part in regular activities you enjoy.

By Susan Reynolds. Sign up for a free newsletter that has proven methods for managing IBS naturally at Irritable Bowel Syndrome Relief Secrets. On the site you’ll also find more information on IBS treatments and more suggestions for tackling IBS diarrhea.

Need Relief from Flat Foot Pain?

Posted in Health & Fitness on February 27th, 2007

Flat feet, also known as fallen arches, is a condition that occurs when the arch in the foot collapses.  The collapse of the arch causes the entire sole of the foot to come into complete contact, or almost in complete contact, with the floor.  As a result, people with flat feet are unable to tread normally and are forced to alter their steps.

What causes flat feet? 
- Genetics - In most cases, (approximately 20-30% of the population) flat feet is genetic and both feet are affected.  Those born with naturally flat feet usually have a malformed joint, or two or more bones may have merged together that caused the feet to become stiff and flat. 
- Injury that causes stiffness and distorts the foot joints such as a ruptured tendon
- Arthritis
- Illness – Diseases that affect the nervous system or muscles (I.E. spian bifida, cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy) can cause flat feet because muscles become week and stiff, and can no longer function effectively together. 
- Natural aging process
- Pregnancy – Sometimes pregnant women develop flat feet from the temporary changes caused by an increase in elastin in their body.

Usually, flat feet is a permanent condition.

What symptoms can occur from having flat feet?  People with flat feet are at a higher risk of developing foot problems because they suffer from over-pronation.  Over-pronation is when the feet roll excessively inward due to the stress overload placed on the ligaments and tendons of the ankle.  This weakens the ankle and inside portion of the foot causing it to turn inward.  Over-pronation can lead to painful symptoms including -

Bunions – A deformity of the big toe that occurs when the joint becomes misaligned and protrude outward. 

Calluses – When the big toe loses flexibility, calluses usually occur under the sole of the foot near the second toe where stress is being placed.

Hammer toes – When the angle of the big toe increases inward, it begins to slide under the second toe.  As a result, the metatarsal bone rises up and causes a hammer toe to form.

Plantar fasciitis and heel spurs – The Achilles tendon becomes shorter and pulls up on the heel of a person with flat feet, causing the arch to flatten and the foot to become longer.  Thus, the plantar fascia (tight band of muscle under the foot arch) becomes abnormally stretched, which can lead to pain in the heel bone (plantar fasciitis) and heel spurs.

Low back pain – This usually occurs due to strain on the sciatic nerve.  This nerve links the lower back to the foot via the leg.  The strain is typically caused by repeated shock from running and over-pronation.

Finding relief from symptoms – There are different methods for treating flat feet, such as –

- Stretching exercises – Engage in exercises (2 – 3 times daily) that focus on the arch of your foot and Achilles’ tendons (IE. rolling your foot back and forth over a rolling pin or foot gymnastics).  This will help increase flexibility and reduce the stress and pain felt by these areas.

- Lose weight – If you are overweight, losing weight helps to provide relief for your feet.

- Wear supportive shoes – Keep an eye on the stability of your footwear.  Don’t wear shoes that are worn, tight, or tilt inwards.  These shoes only increase your risk of injury and pain.  Also, use orthotic insoles for your shoes to provide your foot with better support.

- See a professional – If you suffer from chronic discomfort or pain, seek the attention of a foot specialist such as a podiatrist or orthopedist.  They can help provide you with proper shoes and orthotics that are custom made for your foot.  They can also recommend exercises and even surgery if it is in the patient’s best interest.

By Dave Wilson. Sign up for a free newsletter & discover how to treat your footpain with natural cures for footpain. Discover what to do if you have flat foot pain.  

Choosing the Right Cold or Flu Medication for Those with High Blood Pressure

Posted in Health & Fitness on February 27th, 2007

High blood pressure is an increasingly common affliction, and with it comes the increasing danger of unknowingly putting yourself at risk of new or increased blood pressure issues as a result of the use of over the counter medications as common as cold and flu medicines that are readily available.  How is it that medicines so commonly sold and easily acquired at the local pharmacy can have such dangerous potential?

The answer is in the decongestants and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that these drugs use in order to control some of the symptoms of the cold and the flu, such as a runny nose and sneezing.  Decongestants and NSAIDs unfortunately, commonly cause an increase in blood pressure as a side effect.

In fact, not only do you risk increasing your blood pressure when using regular medications that include decongestants and NSAIDs, but you may also cause a conflict with any blood pressure medications that you may be taking at the same time.

Examples of common decongestant ingredients that can cause blood pressure issues are:

• Phenylephrine
• Oxymetazoline
• Pseudoephedrine

Examples of common NSAIDs that can cause blood pressure issues are:

• Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin)
• Naproxen (Naprosyn)
• Meloxicam (Mobic)
• Naproxen sodium (Aleve)

If you have a family history or personal history of high blood pressure, and especially if you are already taking blood pressure medication to control high blood pressure, it is very important that you be selective about the cold and flu medications that you choose.  Fortunately, some cold and flu medicine companies have recognized this issue, and have created products that have been specially formulated for people who already have high blood pressure.  By opting for these medications, you are making sure that your cold, cough, and flu relief is safe for the rest of your health.  The secret is that these products are free from decongestants, and therefore will not raise your blood pressure.

The following products are decongestant free, and are therefore safe for treating the symptoms of coughs, colds, and the flu, even when you already suffer from high blood pressure or hypertension:

• Coricidin HBP® Cold and Flu Tablets – a medication that uses antihistamines, pain relievers, and fever reducers to temporarily relieve symptoms such as aches and pains (including headaches), while reducing the fever commonly associated with colds and the flu.  These tablets also provide temporary relief of runny nose and sneezing caused by the common cold.

• Coricidin HBP® Cough and Cold Tablets – medication that uses antihistamines and cough suppressants to temporarily relieve the symptoms of coughing and minor throat discomfort that are frequently associated with the common cold.  This medication also temporarily relieves runny nose and sneezing from colds.

• Coricidin HBP® Maximum Strength Flu Tablets – medicine that uses antihistamines, pain relievers, fever reducers, and cough suppressants in order to achieve the temporary relief of cold and flu symptoms which include: coughing, runny nose, sneezing, aches and pains caused by the common cold or the flu.

Even with these medications available to you, it is important that you consult your doctor before taking any over-the-counter medications.  Be certain to keep yourself informed regarding any blood pressure issues you have, and have your doctor and pharmacist help you in understanding the labels on your over-the-counter medicines so that you don’t inadvertently cause or worsen your high blood pressure.

By Paul Johnson. Sign up for a free newsletter & discover other hypertension medication. On the site you’ll also find more about natural high blood pressure cure and what to do to lower blood pressure naturally.

Endometriosis And Interstitial Cystitis

Posted in Health & Fitness on February 23rd, 2007

Endometriosis and interstitial cystitis (IC) have similar symptoms, making it easy for one to be mistaken for the other. In fact, sometimes women who have endometriosis and undergo a hysterectomy mistaken the pain they experience in their pelvic region following the procedure as a return of their endometriosis, when in actuality it could be caused by interstitial cystitis.

What is interstitial cystitis? Interstitial cystitis (pronounced “In-ter-stish-ul sis-ty-tis”), also known as Painful Bladder Syndrome, is a chronic medical condition that is characterized by inflammation of the bladder. This inflammation is believed to occur when the mucous layer inside the bladder is damaged. The damaged mucous layer lets irritating substances, especially urine, come in direct contact with the bladder wall. These substances aggravate the bladder, resulting in inflammation and pain.

It is obvious by the above characteristics of IC that endometriosis and interstitial cystitis are clearly not the same condition, and, therefore, require different treatment. Unfortunately, diagnosis isn’t as easy as one would think because the symptoms of IC closely mirror endometriosis, as the following will illustrate:

Endometriosis symptoms-
• Pelvic pain
• Pain in lower back
• Painful menses - pain before and/or during and/or after menstruation
• Severe menstrual cramping
• Pain during intercourse
• Pain during orgasm
• Heavy menses
• Irregular menses
• Painful bowel movements usually accompanied by an alteration between constipation and diarrhea
• Gastrointestinal upset including bloating, nausea and vomiting
• Bladder pain
• Frequent need to urinate
• Fatigue

Interstitial cystitis symptoms -
• Pelvic pain
• Pain in lower back
• Pain during intercourse
• Pain after intercourse
• Painful menses
• Heavy menses
• Painful bowel movement during menses
• Slight discomfort, tenderness, pressure or pain in the bladder or pelvic area
• Urgent need to urinate
• Frequent need to urinate
• Fatigue

The above symptoms that have been italicised for endometriosis and interstitial cystitis are the same. Although some symptoms differ, you can see how many symptoms are similar between the two. Thus is why IC has been nicknamed endometriosis “evil twin”.

To make matters even worse for some women, it isn’t uncommon for a woman to suffer from both endometriosis and IC. In fact, one study involving 60 women found that more than 79% of these women had both interstitial cystitis and endometriosis at the same time. In some cases, this is often why women still experience pain after they have endometrial tissue removed or why some find their endometriosis hard to treat. The pain they are experiencing is similar to endometriosis but is actually caused by IC.

Therefore, if you have endometriosis and continue to have pain despite the treatments you’ve tried, perhaps it’s time to ask your doctor to further investigate your pain to find out if endometriosis is actually the cause of your problem, or if it’s something else like interstitial cystitis.

If you suspect your may have endometriosis and interstitial cystitis you need to tell your doctor about your suspicions. However, before you jump to conclusions, and before you attend your appointment, it’s a good idea to make a record of the symptoms you are experiencing. Write down the symptoms you experience in one week and present these symptoms to your doctor so he/she can help provide you with better tests for a more effective diagnosis and treatment course.

Keep in mind, if you suspect you have IC the symptoms you need to focus on include:
• Urgency and frequency of urination
• Fluctuation of pain as the bladder empties or fills
• Pelvic or bladder pain that intensifies during menstruation

In addition, if you want an accurate IC diagnosis you may want to request that your doctor refer you to a gynaecologist or urologist. Finally, remember that while both endometriosis and interstitial cystitis are chronic conditions, they are treatable when effectively diagnosed.

By Shelley Ross. To find out more about endometriosis diagnosis and for information on endometriosis characteristics please visit Treat Endometriosis, where you can also sign up for a free newsletter focusing on treating endometriosis.

Are You Getting Enough Calcium From Your Anti Candida Diet?

Posted in Health & Fitness on February 22nd, 2007

It’s true that oral contraceptives increase the risk of Candida overgrowth, but so can your diet. For instance, foods that primarily feed Candida albicans include foods high in starch and sugar. That being said, other foods, including dairy products (with the exception of butter and eggs) also encourage Candida overgrowth. For this reason, many people try to keep their Candida in check by controlling their diet by following an anti candida diet.

Unfortunately, due to the fact that dairy products encourage Candida growth, particularly in those who have an allergy to milk, most dairy products (milk, cheese, ice cream, cream, buttermilk etc.) are often eliminated from the diet. This fact has those on a Candida diet wondering how they can give their body the necessary calcium it needs, without stimulating the growth of Candida albicans.

How can you get the calcium you need without the help of diary?

If you are concerned about calcium, you will be pleased to know that there are many other food sources that contain calcium such as:
- Dark leafy green vegetables (bok choy, kale, cabbage)
- Raw broccoli
- Seaweed
- Dried fruit
- Almonds
- Sesame seeds
- Pinto beans
- Tahini
- Canned salmon
- Canned tuna
- Sardines with edible bones
- Calcium Fortified products (soymilk, tofu, orange juice, etc.)

That being said, you should keep in mind that certain foods that are high in calcium such as spinach and rhubarb also contain oxalates. Oxalates actually block calcium absorption and are, therefore, counter productive. Thus, make sure you research calcium enriched foods before trusting they will provide your body with the calcium it needs. It’s also a good idea to visit a nutritionist or dietician if you plan on using non-dairy foods for sources of calcium.

In addition, in order to help your body maintain healthy calcium levels you should limit or eliminate your intake of caffeine and alcohol. These products deplete calcium levels. Furthermore, make sure you exercise regularly. Lack of exercise is another way to reduce calcium levels.

If you are having a difficult time ingesting foods rich in calcium, or are worried you are not meeting the daily requirements your body needs, you should talk to your doctor about taking calcium supplements.

It is highly recommended that you consult your doctor first before you begin taking calcium supplements. The reason is because it is not possible to accurately determine the correct amount of calcium your body requires without knowing your body chemistry first. There are many different calcium supplements on the market, and there is a high possibility that you can pick one which will make your pH worse rather than improving it.

You see, the vast majority of the less expensive calcium supplements have calcium carbonate listed as their main ingredient. Calcium carbonate is usually created from oyster shells or ground limestone. Calcium from oyster shells is the least effective supplement. Ground limestone, on the other hand, is a better calcium supplement than oyster shells (depending on how fine it’s grinded), but it still doesn’t compare to the better forms.

The best calcium supplement forms include:
- Pure calcium gluconate
- Calcium citrate
- Calcium lactate

In addition, avoid purchasing calcium supplements that list magnesium in their ingredients. The reason is because the body’s Magnesium requirements should be attended to separately from calcium. Thus, the necessary calcium should be taken separately from other minerals. Moreover, you shouldn’t buy combination supplements simply for their calcium content.

Don’t forget that in order for calcium to respond effectively within the body to maintain balance, the correct type must be taken. Therefore, see your doctor first before you start supplementing your anti candida diet.

By Jane Symms. Sign up for a free newsletter that has proven methods for tackling Candida, Candidiasis and yeast infections head-on at Eliminate Candida Naturally. On the site you’ll also find more about the different candida treatment available and information on the benefits of following an anti candida diet.